Author Archives: virtualcurationmuseum

Animation of the Day: Butchered Horse Ulna from Jamestown

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

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Today’s animation is a butchered horse ulna recovered archaeologically by Jamestown Rediscovery. It was scanned on September 5, 2014,  at the Jamestown Rediscovery laboratory. Cut marks on the ulna indicate an attempt to remove flesh for consumption and the bone also exhibits evidence of burning.  The butchered bone dates to the “starving time” during the winter of 1609-1610.

Categories: 17th century, Animation of the day, Gallery, Jamestown Rediscovery, Zooarchaeology | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Blue Shell Edged Plate from James Madison’s Montpelier

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory

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Today’s animation is blue shell edged plate that was recovered archaeologically from James Madison’s Montpelier. It was scanned by Rachael Hulvey, who created this animation.

Categories: 19th century, Animation of the day, Gallery, James Madison's Montpelier | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Musket Ball .75 cal from Bladensburg Battlefield Site

By Ashley Perry, Student Intern with the Virtual Curation Laboratory.

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Today’s animation is of a .75 caliber musket ball recovered from a Bladensburg Battlefield site (18PR) in Maryland and scanned in the VCL by Digital Curation Specialist Lauren Volkers on February 5, 2014. Such a large caliber was common for use in muskets, especially in the British “Brown Bess,” their popular muzzle-loading smoothbore musket that existed in a few variations, including the India Pattern which was used during battles against Napoleon as well as during the War of 1812.  Though it is possible this musket ball comes from a later Civil War component of this site, it is more probable that it is from the War of 1812, given the change in weaponry usage between the 1810’s and the 1860’s and the fact that the .75 caliber became an increasingly rare ammunition size, most Civil War long arms instead using the .69 or .58.

Categories: 19th century, Animation of the day, Battle of Bladensburg, Gallery, War of 1812 | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: .75 Caliber Musket Ball From Bladensburg Battlefield

By Ashley Perry,  VCU student intern with the Virtual Curation Laboratory.

1126_musket_ball_.69(.75cal)

Today’s animation is of a slightly deformed .75 caliber musket ball from a Battle of Bladensburg site (18PR) in Maryland. It was scanned by VCU student intern Bridget Polk on February 6, 2014. It is one of a few .75 caliber musket balls in the Bladensburg Battlefield collection, which were possibly fired from the British Land Pattern Musket 3rd Model (Indian Pattern), also referred to as the “Brown Bess,” or the Royal Navy Sea Service Musket (1778 Model). Both firearms were issued to the British during the War of 1812 and it is likely they would have been present at the Battle of Bladensburg which occurred on August 24, 1814.

Categories: 19th century, Animation of the day, Battle of Bladensburg, Gallery, War of 1812 | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: .58 Caliber Minié Ball

By Ashley Perry,  VCU student intern with the Virtual Curation Laboratory.

1129_minie_ball_.55_.575inToday’s animation is of a .58 caliber Minié ball recovered from the Bladensburg Battlefield site (18PR) in Maryland and scanned in the VCL by Digital Curation Specialist Lauren Volkers on February 6, 2014. However, this artifact is likely from a later Civil War component at this site, because the Minié ball was not invented until 1848. Its use became prevalent in the United States during the Civil War because they were a more efficient and accurate form of ammunition than the previously popular musket balls. Many firearms utilized the .58 caliber, so it is difficult to say in which firearm this bullet was likely used.

Categories: 19th century, Animation of the day, Battle of Bladensburg, Gallery | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Bullet .45 caliber

By Ashley Perry, Student Intern with the Virtual Curation Laboratory.

1102_bullet_0.45 Today’s animation is a .45 caliber bullet from the Bladensburg Battlefield site (51NE44) in Washington, D.C. The artifact was scanned on January 23rd, 2014 in the Virtual Curation Laboratory. Unlike the .44-cal, the .45 was a less popular caliber during the Civil War, though some rifles, such as the J.F. Brown Sniper Rifle, used the round. It is known, however, that the A. B. Weston flintlock turn barrel  pistol was popular among British soldiers for general use and during the War of 1812. It is difficult to say with certainty at this point what gun specifically this bullet was fired from, but these are likely possibilities.

Categories: arms and armament, Battle of Bladensburg, War of 1812 | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: .44 Caliber Bullet

By Ashley Perry, Student Intern with the Virtual Curation Laboratory.

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Today’s animation is a .44 caliber bullet recovered from the Bladensburg Battlefield site (51NE44) in Washington, D.C. It was scanned in the Virtual Curation Laboratory by Student Intern Ashley Perry on January 20th, 2014. The .44 was a popular caliber for many revolvers during the 1800’s, especially during the Civil War with the Colt Army Model 1860 becoming immensely popular with troops on both sides of the war. Approximately 200,000 of these revolvers were produced between the years of 1860 and 1873, over half of those being manufactured for the U.S. government. Though it is difficult to make any determinations based on the sparse information we have, it is possible that this bullet was fired from such a revolver, (or possibly one of the few rifles that employed use of the .44 caliber, such as the infamous Henry Rifle), at Fort Lincoln, the Civil War site that overlaps spatially with the Bladensburg Battlefield site. However, there were pistols of a similar caliber used during the War of 1812, such as the A. B. Weston Turn Barrel flintlock pistol, so that is also a possibility.

Categories: Animation of the day, arms and armament, Battle of Bladensburg, Gallery | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Stone Ball from Fort Hill

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

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Today’s animation is a stone ball that was excavated in 1939 or 1940 as part of work relief archaeology at the Fort Hill site, a Monongahela village in Somerset County, Pennsylvania. It is now within the archaeological collections of The State Museum of Pennsylvania (TSMP). It was presumably used for game playing.  More information on the Work Projects Administration excavations at Fort Hill can be found here.

Excavating at Fort Hill in 1939 or 1940.

Excavating at Fort Hill in 1939 or 1940.

Categories: Animation of the day, Gallery, groundstone, Monongahela tradition, The State Museum of Pennsylvania, villages | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Hinge

By Ashley Perry VCU student intern with the Virtual Curation Laboratory.

 

1114_hingeToday’s animation is what appears to be a strap hinge found at the Bladensburg Battlefield site (51NE44) in Washington, D.C. Strap hinges were used in both window shutters and barn doors, though those used for barns tended to be quite long because of the large size of the doors. They were often made by hand as opposed to in a factory, and had begun to be replaced by the butt hinge in areas of America starting in the 1800s. This artifact was scanned on January 29th, 2014 by Digital Curation Specialist Lauren Volkers and is part of a larger collection of artifacts from the Battle of Bladensburg on loan to the Virtual Curation Laboratory to be scanned for its upcoming bicentennial on August 24th. The hinge could represent Battle of Bladensburg occupation, if not belonging to a later Civil War component.

 

 

Categories: Battle of Bladensburg, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: .58 Caliber Minié Ball

By Ashley Perry, Intern with the Virtual Curation Laboratory

1129_minie_ball_.55_.575in

Today’s animation was scanned in the lab on February 2, 2014 by Digital Curation Specialist Lauren Volkers and is of a .58 caliber Minié ball loaned to the Virtual Curation Laboratory as part of a collection of artifacts found at the Bladensburg Battlefield site in Maryland (18PR). This particular artifact is one of a handful of items recovered that likely belongs to the later Civil War component (Fort Lincoln runs along Bladensburg Road and is right next to Prince George’s County, where the town of Bladensburg is located). .58 caliber Minié balls were the required ammunition of the Springfield Model 1861, a rifled musket in widespread use during the latter parts of the Civil War. The Springfield boasted increased accuracy and range over previous models and is widely considered to be one of the most effective firearms of of its type. Over 1,000,000 of these rifles were manufactured during the war, over a fifth of those being produced by the Springfield Armory in Massachusetts.  An animation of an archaeologically recovered Springfield rifle lock plate from George Washington’s Ferry Farm can be found here.

The "Springfield" Model 1861 Rifle

The “Springfield” Model 1861 Rifle

 

Categories: 19th century, Animation of the day, arms and armament, Battle of Bladensburg, Civil War, Gallery | Leave a comment

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