18th century

Animation of the Day: Reproduction Still from Mount Vernon

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory

 

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Today’s animation is a reproduction still created in 2003 that is still was reproduced in 2003.  According to Mount Vernon‘s Eleanor Breen: “the reproduction is based on a still in the Smithsonian’s collection dated 1787 and marked Bristol.”   It was scanned using a Sense 3D scanner on August 14, 2014.

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Categories: 18th century, Animation of the day, Gallery, Mount Vernon | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Button with the Number “43” from the Betsy Shipwreck

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

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Today’s animation is a button with the number “43”from the Betsy, a British ship sunk off of Yorktown, Virginia, at the end of the Revolutionary War. The ship had been excavated in the 1980s by the Yorktown Shipwreck Archaeological Project under the direction of then Virginia Department of Historic Resources (VDHR) archaeologist John Broadwater. It is in the archaeological collections maintained by VDHR.  It will be incorporated into an exhibit at VDHR created by VCL intern Ivana Adzic.

Ivana Adzic, seated, discusses editing of digital files with VCU professor Monty Jones.

Ivana Adzic, seated, discusses editing of digital files with VCU professor Monty Jones.

Categories: 18th century, Animation of the day, Gallery, Virginia Department of Historic Resources | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: 18th Century Spigot from Colchester in Fairfax County, Virginia

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory

 

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Today’s animation is an 18th century spigot that was scanned at Fairfax County’s Cultural Resource Management and Protection collections repository in the James Lee Community Center, Falls Church, Virginia. According to Chris Sperling of the Colchester Archaeological Research Team (CART), this spigot was found in a cellar feature context from the town of Colchester.  Other artifacts indicate that this context is a 3rd – 4th quarter 18th century deposit.  The cellar is believed to be associated with the house of Morris Pound, a vintner. George Mason IV issued a recommendation and call for subscribers to support Pound’s winemaking, including helping him purchase a press. One of these subscribers was George Washington. This spigot was scanned on July 27, 2012, as detailed here.

VCU alumnus Mariana Zechini sets up the spigot for scanning.

VCU alumnus Mariana Zechini sets up the spigot for scanning.

 

Categories: 18th century, Animation of the day, Fairfax County Archaeology, Gallery | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Hand-Molded Wig Hair Curler from George Washington’s Ferry Farm

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory

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Today’s animation is a hand-molded wig hair curler from an 18th century context associated with George Washington and his family in the home where he grew up as a boy from the age of 6 until his early 20s. It was recovered archaeologically at George Washington’s Ferry Farm. Of the over 200 wig hair curlers recovered from this site, this is the only hand-molded wig hair curler discovered to date.  For more about wig hair curlers, visit our sister blog at the Virtual Curation Laboratory.

Categories: 18th century, Animation of the day, Gallery, George Washington's Ferry Farm | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Pipe Stem Made into a Flute from New York

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory

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Today’s animation is a white clay tobacco pipe stem that has been drilled to function as a flute. It was scanned at the New York State Museum (NYSM) in July 2014. The NYSM’s Susan Winchell-Sweeney provides us with the following information:

Believed to be 50% complete and made circa 1715. It was one of several objects recovered from the fill of
an 18th-c. red brick cistern on Lot 14 of the Broad Financial Center site.This site was situated on the block
bounded by Whitehall, Pearl, Bridge, and Broad streets in lower Manhattan, NY, and was excavated in 1983-
84 under the direction of Dr. Joel Grossman of Greenhouse Consultants, Inc. for HRO International. This site
was located on the original 17th century island of Manhattan as opposed to landfill or man-made land.
Excavation revealed deposits and features dating from the Dutch settlement of New Amsterdam through the
mid-19th century. There are materials associated with the c. 1650 warehouse of Augustine Heermans, a
slave trader and tobacco merchant (including a Dutch token dating 1590-the oldest European artifact
excavated in New York) and domestic deposits from 17th and early 18th century inhabitants of the block.
Artifacts include domestic items from the privy of Dr. Hans Kierstede (the first doctor of the Dutch West
India Company) and his wife Sarah, who was Peter Stuyvesant’s Native American interpreter; a c. 1680
basket filled with Native American and European goods including delft tiles, hand-wrought nails, wampum,
glass trade beads, thimbles and pins, 17 marbles of various sizes and a wooden game board. English
Colonial artifacts include 7,000 fragments of 17th and 18th century clay tobacco pipes made at the Robert
Tippet shop in Bristol, England, and probably shipped to a local tavern on the block, a sword guard, candle
snuffer, candlestick holder, and a delft posset pot. Many other domestic materials date to Federalist and
Jacksonian New York.

Categories: 18th century, Animation of the day, Gallery, musical instrument, New York State Museum | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: ca. 1775 Kitchen Drain from Mount Vernon

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory

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Today’s animation is a ca. 1775 drain associated with a kitchen that was constructed in 1775 at  Mount Vernon. It was scanned using a Sense 3D scanner on August 14, 2014.

Bernard Means scans the drain as Leah Stricker and Luke Pecoraro look on. Photograph by Laura Galke.

Bernard Means scans the drain as Leah Stricker and Luke Pecoraro look on. Photograph by Laura Galke.

Categories: 18th century, Animation of the day, Gallery, Mount Vernon | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: 18th Century Well at the Bray School

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

 

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One of the features being excavated on July 30, 2014, by the joint College of William and Mary/Colonial Williamsburg Foundation CWF) Historical Archaeology Field School was a well associated with the Bray School, founded in 1760 to educate African Americans.   CWF’s Mark Kostro invited me to scan the well using the Sense 3D scanner.  Because the Sense 3D scanner creates real-time results, I was able to show the resulting digital model to field school staff and students.

Scanning the well.  Photograph by Stephanie Bergman.

Scanning the well. Photograph by Stephanie Bergman.

Observing the digital model of the well. Photograph by Stephanie Bergman.

Observing the digital model of the well. Photograph by Stephanie Bergman.

 

Categories: 18th century, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: 18th Century Foundation at the Bray School

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

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The morning of  July 30, 2014, found me at the location of the joint College of William and Mary/Colonial Williamsburg Foundation CWF) Historical Archaeology Field School.  Under the direction of CWF’s Mark Kostro, field school students are working in the location of the Bray School, founded in 1760 to educate African Americans.  Details on these excavations can be found here. Today’s animation is a  scan made using the Sense 3D scanner on a section of a foundation attributed to either a diary or a smokehouse. The large square opening adjacent to the foundation is a post hole. And, there is also a drainage pipe and trench  as well.

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Categories: 18th century, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: 18th Century Brewery Pit at William and Mary

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

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Today’s animation is a pit associated with an 18th-century structure on the campus of the College of William and Mary, adjacent to the Wren Building.  Colonial Williamsburg Foundation CWF) archaeologists attribute this  pit, with bricks at its base, as part of a brewery. I scanned this pit using the Sense 3D scanner. A portion of the scanned foundations can be seen here.

Scanning the brewery pit. Photograph by Crystal Castleberry.

Scanning the brewery pit. Photograph by Crystal Castleberry.

Categories: 18th century, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: 18th Century Brewery Foundations at William and Mary

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

wren_building_02_edited

On July 30, 2014, I visited the excavations of an 18th-century structure on the campus of the College of William and Mary, adjacent to the Wren Building.  The excavations, conducted under the auspices of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation CWF), have uncovered the remains of what appear to the the foundations of a brewery. The scan made using the Sense 3D scanner focuses on a part of the structure showing where an addition had been made, cut by a modern utility line.  CWF archaeologist (and former intern in the VCL) Crystal Castleberry provided me with a tour of the excavations.

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Scanning the foundations. Photograph by Crystal Castleberry.

Crystal Castleberry.

Crystal Castleberry.

Categories: 18th century, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation | 1 Comment

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