dog

Animation of the Day: Complete Goat Horn from Jamestown

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

1642_goat_horn

Today’s animation is a goat horn recovered archaeologically by Jamestown Rediscovery.  According to Merry Outlaw, Curator of Archaeology for Jamestown Rediscovery, the butchered horn is from the post structure in the palisade extension to the original James Fort. It came from a large cellar (possible well) and dates prior to 1624. More information on the excavation of this feature can be found here.

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Categories: Animation of the day, dog, Gallery, groundhog, Jamestown Rediscovery, mandible, Zooarchaeology | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Animation of the (Last) Week: Butchered Dog Humerus from Jamestown

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

Note: The director was occupied with a gas leak in his home this past week, which is why this is a tad delayed.

1622_butchered_dog_ulna

Today’s animation is a butchered dog humerus recovered archaeologically by Jamestown Rediscovery.  Cut marks on the dog humerus indicate an attempt to remove flesh for consumption.  The butchered mandible dates to the “starving time” dated to the winter of 1609-1610. A spectacular forensic archaeological discovery announced early last year by Jamestown Rediscovery confirmed historic documents that indicate the residents of James Fort also turned toward cannibalism. For more on the individual identified as “Jane” whose body exhibits evidence of cannibalism, you can read Jane’s Story here.

Categories: Animation of the day, dog, Gallery, groundhog, Jamestown Rediscovery, mandible, Zooarchaeology | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Animated Object of the Day: Maxillae of a Dog from the Winslow Site

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory

1324_dog_maxilla

 

Today’s object is the maxillae of a dog from the Winslow site, an American Indian village in Maryland, that was scanned at the Virginia Museum of Natural History on July 17, 2014.

 

 

Categories: Animation of the day, dog, Gallery, maxillae, ulna, Zooarchaeology | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Animated Object of the Day: Mandible (right) of a Dog from the Winslow Site

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory

1322_dog_mandible_right

 

Today’s object is the right mandible of a dog from the Winslow site, an American Indian village in Maryland, that was scanned at the Virginia Museum of Natural History on July 17, 2014.

bkm_2014-07-17 11.24.34

 

 

 

Categories: Animation of the day, dog, Gallery, mandible, Zooarchaeology | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Animated Object of the Day: Ulna of a Dog from the Winslow Site

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory

1321_dog_ulna

Today’s object is the ulna of a dog from the Winslow site, an American Indian village in Maryland, that was scanned at the Virginia Museum of Natural History on July 17, 2014.

bkm_2014-07-17 10.32.46

 

Categories: Animation of the day, dog, Gallery, ulna, Zooarchaeology | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Late 17th Century Smoking Pipe from Jamestown

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

 

1308_pipe

Today’s animation is an early 17th century smoking pipe recovered archaeologically by Jamestown Rediscovery, dating to ca. 1670.

Categories: 17th century, Animation of the day, dog, Gallery, groundhog, Jamestown Rediscovery, Smoking pipe | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Early 17th Century Smoking Pipe from Jamestown

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

1306_pipe

Today’s animation is an early 17th century smoking pipe recovered archaeologically by Jamestown Rediscovery.  It was found in the same cellar as the remains of a young woman known as “Jane.” For more on the individual identified as “Jane” whose body exhibits evidence of cannibalism, you can read Jane’s Story here.

Categories: 17th century, Animation of the day, dog, Gallery, groundhog, Jamestown Rediscovery, Smoking pipe | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Native Pipe from Jamestown’s “John Smith” Well

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

1169_john_smith_well_pipeToday’s animation is a native-made pipe recovered archaeologically by Jamestown Rediscovery from the “John Smith” well and therefore dates between 1608 and 1610. It was scanned on March 5, 2014, by the VCL’s Digital Curation Specialist Lauren  Volkers at the Jamestown Rediscovery laboratory.  More details about a recent scanning trip to Jamestown Rediscovery is present at our companion site for the Virtual Curation Laboratory.

Lauren Volkers examines the pipe as it is b eing scanned.

Lauren Volkers examines the pipe as it is being scanned.

Categories: Animation of the day, dog, Gallery, groundhog, Jamestown Rediscovery, mandible, Zooarchaeology | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Butchered Horse Tibia from Jamestown

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

1170_butchered_horse_tibia

Today’s animation is a butchered horse tibia recovered archaeologically by Jamestown Rediscovery. It was scanned on March 5, 2014, by the VCL’s Digital Curation Specialist Lauren  Volkers at the Jamestown Rediscovery laboratory. Cut marks on tibia indicate an attempt to remove flesh for consumption.  The butchered bone dates to the “starving time” during the winter of 1609-1610. VCL scanned a dog  mandible with butchery marks on an earlier visit, as documented here. More details about a recent scanning trip to Jamestown Rediscovery is present at our companion site for the Virtual Curation Laboratory.

Butchered horse tibia.

Butchered horse tibia.

Categories: Animation of the day, dog, Gallery, groundhog, Jamestown Rediscovery, mandible, Zooarchaeology | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Butchered Dog Mandible from Jamestown

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

1059_dog_mandible_butcheredToday’s animation is a butchered dog mandible recovered archaeologically by Jamestown Rediscovery.  Cut marks on the dog mandible near the broken end indicate an attempt to remove flesh for consumption.  The butchered mandible dates to the “starving time” dated to the winter of 1609-1610. A spectacular forensic archaeological discovery announced earlier this year by Jamestown Rediscovery confirmed historic documents that indicate the residents of James Fort also turned toward cannibalism. For more on the individual identified as “Jane” whose body exhibits evidence of cannibalism, you can read Jane’s Story here.

Categories: Animation of the day, dog, Gallery, groundhog, Jamestown Rediscovery, mandible, Zooarchaeology | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

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