worked bone

Animation of the Week: Bone Bead from Monongahela Village Site

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

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Today’s animation is a fragment of a bone bead recovered in 1939 or 1940 by a Work Projects Administration (WPA) crew from the Fort Hill site, a Monongahela tradition village site located in Somerset County, Pennsylvania. It is now within the archaeological collections of The State Museum of Pennsylvania (TSMP).

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Categories: Animation of the day, Gallery, Monongahela tradition, The State Museum of Pennsylvania, villages, worked bone | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Bone Bead from Fort Hill

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

113_bone_bead_edited

Today’s animation is a bone bead recovered archaeologically from the Fort Hill site, a Monongahela village excavated by a Work Projects Administration (WPA) crew in 1939 or 1940  in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, under the direction of Edgar E. Augustine  (Means 2002).  This artifact is now in the collections of The State Museum of Pennsylvania.

Reference Cited:

Means, Bernard K.

2002 “….To Reconstruct These Houses of Men Who Lived in a Stone Age:” ModelingVillage Community Organization Using Data from the SomersetCounty Relief Excavations.  In Northeast Subsistence-Settlement Change: A.D. 700 – A.D. 1300, edited by John P. Hart and Christina Rieth, pp. 43-71. New York State Museum Bulletin 496. The University of the State of New York, Albany.

Categories: Animation of the day, Gallery, Monongahela tradition, The State Museum of Pennsylvania, villages, worked bone, Zooarchaeology | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Elk Metatarsal Defleshing Tool from Jamestown

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

 

1241_defleshing_tool

Today’s animation is an elk metatarsal recovered archaeologically by Jamestown Rediscovery. It was scanned on April 7, 2014, in the Jamestown Rediscovery laboratory. It is unknown whether this tool was made by the colonists in Europe or by American Indians from a native elk.  The defleshing tool is stained green at its working edge from contact with a copper object. A replica painted by intern Bridget Polk was provided to the staff of Jamestown Rediscovery for public archaeology purposes on April 18, 2019.

Replica (top) and original (bottm) of the defleshing tool.

Replica (top) and original (bottm) of the defleshing tool.

 

Categories: 17th century, Animation of the day, Gallery, Jamestown Rediscovery, osteology, worked bone, Zooarchaeology | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Antler Tool from the Consol Site

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

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Today’s animation is a naturally shed antler that has been modified on one end to have a blunt edge and may have served as a defleshing tool.  This artifact is from the Consol site, a Monongahela tradition village, and was recovered archaeologically by members of the Westmoreland Archaeological Society, a chapter of the Society for Pennsylvania Archaeology.

Categories: Animation of the day, Gallery, Monongahela tradition, Society for Pennsylvania Archaeology, Westmoreland Archaeological Society, worked bone, Zooarchaeology | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Pierced Turtle Carapace

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

1056_Turtle_Carapace_Pierced

Today’s animation is a fragment of a drilled turtle carapace that was excavated as part of salvage work at the Martin site, a Monongahela village now under the waters of the Youghiogheny Reservoir. It is now within the archaeological collections of The State Museum of Pennsylvania (TSMP). This particular object was scanned on December 17, 2013 by Digital Curation Supervisor Ashley McCuistion and Digital Zooarchaeologist Mariana Zechini at TSMP with support from the Department of Defense’s Legacy Program.

Crew member stands adjacent to excavated Monongahela house in 1941.

Crew member stands adjacent to excavated Monongahela house in 1941.

Update! Matthew Bradley viewed this post and presents evidence that this might be a leg rattle using online collections links.  We appreciate his insights.  See the links cited here:

http://anthro.amnh.org/anthropology/databases/common/image_dup.cfm?catno=50%20%20%2F%207292&from_anthro=no

http://collections.nmnh.si.edu/search/anth/?irn=8337882

Categories: Animation of the day, Gallery, Monongahela tradition, The State Museum of Pennsylvania, villages, worked bone | Tags: , , , | 3 Comments

Animation of the Day: Cannel Coal Pendant from Fort Hill

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

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Today’s animation is a cannel coal pendant recovered archaeologically from the Fort Hill site, a Monongahela village excavated by a Work Projects Administration (WPA) crew in 1939 or 1940  in Somerst County, Pennsylvania, under the direction of Edgar E. Augustine  (Means 2002). Archaeologist William C. Johnson (2001:82) suggests that these were badges worn by the Monongahela and that helps identify the Monongahela as the Black Minqua. This artifact is now in the collections of The State Museum of Pennsylvania.

Sticks were placed in postholes to keep track of feature locations during winter excavations at Fort Hill.

Sticks were placed in postholes to keep track of feature locations during winter excavations at Fort Hill.

References Cited:

Johnson, William C.
2001  The Protohistoric Monongahela and the Case for an Iroquois Connection. In Societies in Eclipse: Archaeology of the Eastern Woodlands Indians, A.D. 1400-1700, edited by David S. Brose, C. Wesley Cowan, and Robert C. Mainfort, Jr., pp. 67-82.

Means, Bernard K.
2002 “….To Reconstruct These Houses of Men Who Lived in a Stone Age:” ModelingVillage Community Organization Using Data from the SomersetCounty Relief Excavations.  In Northeast Subsistence-Settlement Change: A.D. 700 – A.D. 1300, edited by John P. Hart and Christina Rieth, pp. 43-71. New York State Museum Bulletin 496. The University of the State of New York, Albany.

Categories: Animation of the day, Gallery, Monongahela tradition, The State Museum of Pennsylvania, villages, worked bone | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Pierced Bear Tooth

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

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Today’s animation is a pierced bear canine recovered archaeologically from the Hatfield site, a Monongahela village excavated by members of the Society for Pennsylvania Archaeology’s Allegheny Chapter in Washington County, Pennsylvania. This pierced bear tooth was likely worn as part of a necklace.

Categories: Animation of the day, canine, Gallery, Monongahela tradition, Society for Pennsylvania Archaeology, The State Museum of Pennsylvania, villages, worked bone, Zooarchaeology | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Worked Bone Tool

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

VCU_3D_122 (repaired)

Today’s animation is a worked bone tool found in 1939 or 1940 by a Work Projects Administration (WPA) crew laboring at Fort Hill, a multi-component Monongahela tradition village site located in Somerset County, Pennsylvania. It is now within the archaeological collections of The State Museum of Pennsylvania (TSMP). This particular object was scanned on December 21. 2011 in the VCL as part of a loan from the TSMP and with funding support from the Department of Defense(DoD)’s Legacy Program. Details on that DoD Legacy Program-funded project (11-334) can be foundhere.

A farmer stands in the foreground, with the mesa-like Fort Hill in the distance.

A farmer stands in the foreground, with the mesa-like Fort Hill in the distance.

Categories: Animation of the day, Gallery, Monongahela tradition, The State Museum of Pennsylvania, villages, worked bone | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Drilled Bone Pendant

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

844_Pendant_Drilled

Today’s animation is a fragment of a drilled bone pendant recovered in 1937 by a Work Projects Administration (WPA) crew from the Reckner site, a Monongahela tradition village site located in Somerset County, Pennsylvania. It is now within the archaeological collections of The State Museum of Pennsylvania (TSMP). This particular object was scanned on July 30, 2013 at TSMP with support from a Virginia Commonwealth University College of Humanities and Sciences Faculty Council’s Need Grants Award. Details on that award can be found here.

A WPA crew excavates at the Reckner site.

A WPA crew excavates at the Reckner site.

Categories: Animation of the day, Gallery, Monongahela tradition, The State Museum of Pennsylvania, villages, worked bone | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Bone Brush Back

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory

915_FF_BrushToday’s animation is a replica of a bone brush back.The bristles from this brush have rotted away, but when it was complete, the brush would have been used to maintain a woman’s hair.This 18th century bone brush back was found at George Washington’s Ferry Farm and belonged to George’s mother Mary or his sister Betty.  A video produced for Instagram by Archaeology in the Community in the Virtual Curation Laboratory features Olivia McCarty discussing the object, using a printed version made with a MakerBot Replicator.  The InstaGram video can be found here: http://instagram.com/p/irEG2TKqbK/

Categories: 18th century, Animation of the day, Gallery, George Washington's Ferry Farm, worked bone | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

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