Monthly Archives: January 2014

Animation of the Day: Pamplin Pipe Bowl with Geometric Protrusions

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory

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Today’s animation is a pipe bowl with conical protrustions across its surface.  The pipe bowl was manufactured at the Pamplin Pipe Factory, a site located in Appomattox County, Virginia, and is in the archaeological collections maintained by the Virginia Department of Historic Resources.  A printed version was made with a MakerBot Replicator.

Categories: 19th century, Animation of the day, Gallery, Pamplin Pipe Factory, Smoking pipe, Virginia Department of Historic Resources | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Pamplin Pipe Bowl in Shape of Bearded Man

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory

222_r_e_lee_pipe

Today’s animation is a pipe bowl in the shape of a bearded man.  The pipe bowl was manufactured at the Pamplin Pipe Factory, a site located in Appomattox County, Virginia, and is in the archaeological collections maintained by the Virginia Department of Historic Resources.  It is listed as an R. E. Lee pipe, but more closely resembles Stonewall Jackson. A printed version was made with a MakerBot Replicator.

Categories: 19th century, Animation of the day, Gallery, Pamplin Pipe Factory, Smoking pipe, Virginia Department of Historic Resources | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Butchered Dog Mandible from Jamestown

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

1059_dog_mandible_butcheredToday’s animation is a butchered dog mandible recovered archaeologically by Jamestown Rediscovery.  Cut marks on the dog mandible near the broken end indicate an attempt to remove flesh for consumption.  The butchered mandible dates to the “starving time” dated to the winter of 1609-1610. A spectacular forensic archaeological discovery announced earlier this year by Jamestown Rediscovery confirmed historic documents that indicate the residents of James Fort also turned toward cannibalism. For more on the individual identified as “Jane” whose body exhibits evidence of cannibalism, you can read Jane’s Story here.

Categories: Animation of the day, dog, Gallery, groundhog, Jamestown Rediscovery, mandible, Zooarchaeology | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Animations of the Day: Temporally Diagnostic Chipped Stone Tools

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory

McCuistion-ASV-Powerpoint_smallerToday’s animation is adapted from a slide created by Ashley McCuistion, Digital Curation Supervison in the Virtual Curation Laboratory.  Her slide was part of her presentation at the October 2013 Annual Meeting of the Archeological Society of Virginia. In that same month, the Virtual Curation Laboratory began a new project funded by the Department of Defense’s Legacy Program. This project is entitled “Virtual Mobility Archaeology Project with Further Applications of Three Dimensional Digital Scanning of Archaeological Objects.” Our basic goals with this project are to expand our virtual models of temporally diagnostic chipped stone tools and the bones from various species of animals to create digital typological collections.  These digital type collections are to be accessible anywhere in the world, and can be used for educational as well as identification and research purposes.

Categories: Animation of the day, chipped stone tools | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Canine Effigy Smoking Pipe

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

181_canine pipeToday’s animation is a clay smoking pipe that was made and used by the Susquehannock Indians during the early 1600s A.D. It represents a canine and may have been a totem animal.Ethnohistorian Matthew T. Bradley has suggested to VCL that this animal may be a fox, as the Fox clan has been documented historically among the Susquehannock (Bradley 2008:4). Unlike other smoking pipes of this period that we have scanned in the VCL, this canine looks at the smoker rather than facing away.  The pipe was recovered from a deep silo-shaped pit of the Funk Phase period (ca 1400-1550 AD.) at the Shenks Ferry (36LA2) site and is within the archaeological collections of The State Museum of Pennsylvania.  A video produced for Instagram by Archaeology in the Community in the Virtual Curation Laboratory features the VCL’s Digital Zooarchaeologist Mariana Zechini discussing the smoking pipe, using a printed version made with a MakerBot Replicator.  The InstaGram video can be found here: http://instagram.com/p/jqMNtHqqSD/#

Reference cited:

Bradley, Matthew Timothy
2008 The development of Iroquoian clans. Paper presented at the Conference on Iroquois Research, Rensselaerville, N.Y., October 3–5, 2008. Available online at: https://db.tt/bkN43h3k

Categories: 17th century, Animation of the day, Gallery, Smoking pipe, Susquehannock, The State Museum of Pennsylvania, zoomorphic | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

Animation of the Day: Groundhog Skull with Perimortem Damage

745_groundhog skullby Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory (VCL)

Today’s animation is a groundhog skull that was recovered by Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) student Ashley McCuistion (now the VCL’s Digital Curation Supervisor) in summer 2012 while she was digging at George Washington’s Ferry Farm. in Fredericksburg, Virginia, as part of the VCU archaeological field school. The skull and the rest of the groundhog skeleton were buried by archaeologists working in the 1990s. The skull exhibits damage from the time of death (perimortem) to its left cheek bone, probably associated with the animal’s demise.  Further details about this finding can be found at the VCL’s web site. A video produced for Instagram by Archaeology in the Community in the Virtual Curation Laboratory features the VCL’s Digital Zooarchaeologist Mariana Zechini discussing the skull, using a printed version made with a MakerBot Replicator.  The InstaGram video can be found here: http://instagram.com/p/jniwY7KqUc/#

Categories: 20th century, Animation of the day, cranium, Gallery, George Washington's Ferry Farm, groundhog | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Smoking Pipe with Masonic Emblem

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory

495_Masonic pipe FFToday’s animation is a clay tobacco smoking pipe made in England but recovered archaeologically at George Washington’s Ferry Farm. The pipe has a molded Masonic emblem. This pipe may have belonged to George Washington himself, and the Masonic emblem was positioned to be seen by the smoker and no others.  A video produced for Instagram by Archaeology in the Community in the Virtual Curation Laboratory features Olivia McCarty discussing the object, using a printed version made with a MakerBot Replicator.  The InstaGram video can be found here: http://instagram.com/p/jh-KOmKqat/

Categories: 18th century, Animation of the day, Gallery, George Washington's Ferry Farm, Smoking pipe | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Wig Hair Curler

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory

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Today’s animation is a wig hair curler used to maintain the wig hair worn by elite men. It was found at George Washington’s Ferry Farm.  Wigs were usually the single most expensive item of a gentleman’s wardrobe. Because George Washington himself did not wear a wig, this wig hair curler was used to maintain the wigs of one of his younger brothers.  A video produced for Instagram by Archaeology in the Community in the Virtual Curation Laboratory features Olivia McCarty discussing the object, using a printed version made with a MakerBot Replicator.  The InstaGram video can be found here: http://instagram.com/p/jfNtmRKqQy/

Categories: 18th century, Animation of the day, Gallery, George Washington's Ferry Farm | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Animation of the Day: Name seal for a World War II Japanese soldier

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory

721_japanese_sealToday’s animated object is a name seal that belonged to a Japanese soldier fighting Americans during World War II, and is in the collections of Clover Hill High School.  The artifact itself is hand carved out of a balsa-like wood. The artifact was made available for scanning in the Virtual Curation Laboratory by teacher James Triesler of Clover Hill High School in Midlothian, Virginia. A video produced for Instagram by Archaeology in the Community in the Virtual Curation Laboratory features Olivia McCarty discussing the object, using a printed version made with a MakerBot Replicator.  The InstaGram video can be found here: http://instagram.com/p/jchSwqKqRG/#

Categories: Japanese soldiers, World War II | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Animated Object of the Day: Human Mandible

by Bernard K. Means, Director of the Virtual Curation Laboratory

888_manible_humanOur animation for today is a human mandible that was scanned and edited by Allen Huber, our Digital Technology Supervisor.  This mandible was scanned to help students learn osteology. Human remains are very fragile and printed replicas help protect the original bone. The mandible is a medical specimen once used to teach students at the Medical College of Virginia and is now incorporated into the osteology teaching of Dr. Amy Verrelli. A video produced for Instagram by Archaeology in the Community in the Virtual Curation Laboratory features the Virtual Curation Laboratory’s Mariana Zechini discussing the object made with a MakerBot Replicator.  The InstaGram video can be found here: http://instagram.com/p/jawbffqqU-/#

Categories: Animation of the day, Gallery, Homo sapiens, mandible, osteology | Leave a comment

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